About  Contact  Privacy  Social media (main pages): Facebook, Instagram, Linkedin, Twitter, YouTube  


Copyright of the information included in this web site: © EURAN and / or EURAN´s content providers.

Copyright web site © 2021 EURAN, European Art Networks AB, Stockholm, Sweden

Creative and Cultural Industries

“The creative economy contributes just over 6.1% to global gross domestic product (GDP), averaging between 2% and 7% of national GDPs around the world. According to UN estimates, the creative economy industries generate annual revenues of $2.25 trillion and account for 30 million jobs worldwide. Nearly half of these workers are women, and these industries employ more people ages 15-29 than any other sector. Television and the visual arts make up the largest industries of the creative economy in terms of revenue, while visual arts and music are the largest industries in terms of employment”.

(www.thepolicycircle.org/)


Creative Economy 2,25 trillion USD


Please notice that the above videos are included here as information about the industry. There is no affiliation between our firm and the personalities and projects shown above.

…...................................




"”Cultural industries" are those industries producing and distributing goods or services which at the time they are developed are considered to have a specific attribute, use or purpose which embodies or conveys cultural expressions, irrespective of the commercial value they may have. Besides the traditional arts sectors (performing arts, visual arts, cultural heritage – including the public sector), they include film, DVD and video, television and radio, video games, new media, music, books and press. This concept is  defined in relation to cultural expressions in the context of the 2005 UNESCO Convention on the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions. "Creative industries" are those industries which use culture as an input and have a cultural dimension, although their outputs are mainly functional. They include architecture and design, which integrate creative elements into wider processes, as well as subsectors such as graphic design, fashion design or advertising. At a more peripheral level, many other industries rely on content production for their own development and are therefore to some extent interdependent with CCIs. They include among others tourism and the new technologies sector. These industries are not explicitly covered by the concept of CCIs used in this Green Paper though.”


(From the European Commission related document “Unlocking the potential of cultural and creative industries” Brussels, 27.4.2010 COM(2010) 183 final ).